Osteoporosis

One in five men and one in two women over the age of 50 will suffer fractures related to Osteoporosis according to the National Osteoporosis Society. Osteoporosis related fractures in people over 50 years old occur every 2 minutes.

The big problem with Osteoporosis is that it is a “silent disease”. Most people will not realise they have it until they have received a fracture, 1/5 of female patients have not been diagnosed until they have suffered 3 or more breaks. A person that has a break due to Osteoporotic bones will have a 1/8 chance of having another break within a year and 1/5 within 5 years.

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So, what is Osteoporosis?

Bone is made up of an outer shell called the cortical bone and an inner mesh of trabelcular bone. This inner mesh looks a bit like a honeycomb. Bone is alive and is constantly changing. Bone ages and becomes worn, this worn born is then broken down by Osteoclasts. This broken down bone is replaced by cells called Osteoblasts. This is called bone turnover and is constantly happening. In a child this turnover for the whole body is completed in 2 years. In adults this takes between 7 and 10 years. When we get older, typically around the mid 30′s this production of Osteoblasts slows down meaning bone gets broken down but not rebuilt, leading to less bone mass and eventually Osteoporosis. This speeds up even more for women following menopause.

There are many things a person can do to try to build healthy bones, the easiest and best way is through exercise. Doing weight-bearing exercises exerts pressure on the bones and this helps them become and remain stronger, so just doing some aerobics or jogging will be of benefit. Obviously, if a patient has osteoporosis then high impact, vigorous sports will be discouraged but it is still vital to stay active, so swimming, walking, gardening and tai chi would be beneficial.

Diet is also a contributing factor, eating plenty of fruit and veg as well as starchy foods, wholegrain is best, as well as dairy. Making sure you get enough protein in your diet is important also, so some meat, fish, eggs, beans, tofu etc should be included.

Another part of your diet that may affect your bones is whether you smoke or not. The toxins from smoking damages the Osteoblasts and so effects the production of bone cells. Excessive drinking also damages the bone and can increase the chance of falling, leading to a break.

Vitamin D is very important as it helps the body absorb the calcium required, 99% of the calcium in a person’s body is stored in the bones. The best source of Vitamin D is from the sun, so it is advised to get out and about in order to get this, you can get supplements if somebody can’t get out much or cover themselves up for cultural or religious reasons.

osteoporosis

Osteoporosis Treatments

There are currently some drugs that sufferers can take that slow down the production of Osteoclasts, the cells that break down old, worn bone. This means that the bones become less porous, however, there is still old, worn bone there that is of poor quality.

These drugs do not increase the bone density, just slows the degradation process.

How MBST can increase bone density and be used as a treatment for Osteoporosis.

There have been many studies and clinical trials into Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis and other degenerative diseases and disorders of the musculoskeletal system and potential methods to alleviate the symptoms and even cure the underlying problems. Here I look into some of these studies with a particular focus on the potential use of MBST® for the treatment of patients suffering from Osteoporosis.

According to the National Osteoporosis Society, Osteoporosis (OP) currently affects 3 million people in the UK alone (1). This number may not be completely accurate as generally people only become diagnosed with OP after a fracture has occurred with DXA scans then taking place to confirm. Often these scans aren’t prescribed until a third fracture has occurred.

Osteoporosis can occur throughout the body – which is more common – or can be onset in particular areas due to injury. Due to our ageing population and western lifestyles OP is on the rise. This puts a large burden on the economy as healthcare costs rise due to fractures and the subsequent rehabilitation. The direct costs of osteoporotic fractures to the health services in the European Union in the year 2000 were estimated at 32 billion Euros (2), reports suggest this cost will double by 2050.

osteoporosis mid left image

Due to rising diagnosis of OP and the costs involved in treating sufferers, the medical community is searching for ways to reduce the occurrence. Currently the main treatment options are medication to stop the reduction of bone mineral density and lifestyle changes to avoid risk factors. We need to be looking at ways to increase the bone density, not just slow down the reduction of it.

Due to rising diagnosis of OP and the costs involved in treating sufferers, the medical community is searching for ways to reduce the occurrence. Currently the main treatment options are medication to stop the reduction of bone mineral density and lifestyle changes to avoid risk factors. We need to be looking at ways to increase the bone density, not just slow down the reduction of it.

A recent study by Krpan et al looked to demonstrate long term effects of the therapeutic use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on bone mineral density (BMD) parameters in patients with OP. They took 103 patients aged 45-89 who had T-scores of BMD less than -2.5, they received MBST for one hour per day on 10 consecutive days. DEXA were used to measure BMD at baseline and 12 months post treatment. From baseline to 12 months they saw significant increases of BMD and serum levels of osteocalcin. β-CTX remained the stable. This saw the team conclude that “NMR-Therapy can be considered a useful alternative or supplement to medical therapy in patients with osteoporosis.” (5)

As well as seeing the benefits to patients on a personal level we must also know what is happening at a cellular level to know why this is happening. In 2005 a study was undertaken to see what effect NMR had on cell proliferation, cellular apostosis and the viability of human chondrocyte and osteoblasts. This study by Temiz-Artmann et al lasted 19 days, 9 days having one hour of treatment per day and then a cell count used after 10 further days. The study was undertaken of course in a controlled, double-blind, randomized manner and they used commercially viable human cell lines. After 10 days NMRT “did not induce apotosis or inhibit cell viability but revealed a tendency of an elevated cell proliferation rate” (6). Also, Steinecker-Frohnwiesser et al tells us that NMRT induced changes in the modulation of signal transduction pathways involved in cartilage degeneration, possibly causing the observed pain reduction in clinical trials. (7)

There are many more studies that are available on MBST and magnetic resonance for therapeutic use. If you would like to read these or the references used here then please ask us and we will be happy to pass these on. Some papers are only in German but all the ones used here are in English or are quite easy to get an English translation.